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8 Iconic Vinyl Moments In Pop Culture


Fri, April, 15 by


Vinyl lovers, rejoice! Record Store Day lands this weekend in Canada on April 15, celebrating nine years since its inception. The day is filled with special vinyl releases, promotional material, and contests at independent retailers across the country.

In honour of this day and the eclectic culture that surrounds record collecting, we’re counting down eight of the best record moments in film. Check them out!

Pretty In Pink

Duckie, the eccentric high schooler form the classic Pretty In Pink, makes quite an entrance with his “performance” of Otis Redding’s Try A Little Tenderness. Unfortunately, his dramatics fail to make Andie fall in love with him.

Ghost World

In this 2001 film, Enid becomes mesmerized with a record of Devil Got My Woman. Seymour allows himself to become vulnerable through giving Enid access to his record collection and ultimately, it’s the music that brings them together.

Jackie Brown

In the middle of this 1997 crime thriller, director Quentin Tarantino was able to inject a pretty chill record-listening scene. Jackie puts on The Delfonics’ Didn’t I Blow Your Mind This Time and talks guns, jail time, and her vinyl collection.

Moonrise Kingdom

In this Wes Anderson film, two lovesick kids Sam and Suzy declare their love for one another and share their first (and second, and third) kiss on the shore of a dreary beach, all while the Françoise Hardy song, Le Temps de l’Amour plays on their portable record player.

The Virgin Suicides

In Sofia Coppola’s 1999 film she depicts youth, love and music in the ’70s in the best way possible. After the Lisbon sisters are confined to their home, they communicate with the boys of their neighbourhood over the phone by playing records, speaking through the longing lyrics of Carole King, Todd Rundgren and the Bee Gees.

High Fidelity

In this quintessential record movie, record collector/lover Rob Gordon narrates his life by the albums, songs and mixtapes he listens to. This film best illustrates the way vinyl collectors make sense of their lives with the music they love. Alphabetically? Chronologically? Autobiographically!

Almost Famous

In this film, protagonist William Miller’s older sister lets the Simon and Garfunkel’s America speak for her. Before leaving home, she leaves her kid brother with her vinyl collection and the promise that the records will “set him free”. He just has to remember to listen to the music with a candle burning.