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SoundCloud Joins The League Of Paid Music Streaming


After months of dealing with licensing issues, SoundCloud has now entered world of music streaming services, but can it hang with the big dogs?

The new service called SoundCloud Go adds new aspects to the brand’s base service. Like most services, SoundCloud Go offers an ad-free listening experience and the ability to download and save songs and playlists to your device for offline listening. But to make their service really stand out, SoundCloud Go now offers songs from official label releases as part of their new service.

Fear not, struggle rappers and experimental garage band producers, the base version of SoundCloud will still be available for those who don’t want to pay the price of $12.99 for the premium benefits. SoundCloud’s goal is to create one central hub where established artists on major labels and the undiscovered artists can coexist, making it a smoother experience for the user. Is the ability to seamlessly listen to both big artists and unknowns within the same application worth the extra 3-4 bucks? SoundCloud seems to think so.

So if you already pay for a music streaming service, SoundCloud Go is trying to win you over, by giving you all of your tunes in one place, eventually.

Currently, the service offers 125 million songs. The Verge notes that at least 110 of these songs are free songs or remixes, leaving the SoundCloud Go service with about 15 million paid songs, which is close to half of other established streaming services. Of those songs, notable artists like Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, and Justin Bieber are absent.

The new service just recently launched so it’ll be interesting to see if it has the legs to keep up with other streaming powerhouses or if it will eventually fade out, like our old friend Limewire.