How do you want to login to your MUCH account?

Don't have an account? Sign up now.

It looks like you haven't changed your password in a while. For your security, please change it now.

You can opt-out from either of these at any time

Any questions or concerns please contact us.

loading

‘Our Song’ To ‘Call It What You Want’: The Evolution Of Taylor Swift’s Love Songs

Taylor Swift, Call It What You Want

Taylor Swift has made a career out of writing personal songs about love, heartbreak, friendship and family and has spent the past 11 years establishing herself as one of the greatest songwriters in music.

With a career that began while Swift was still in her teens, Swift’s songs on romance have shown the greatest growth, with today’s new single “Call It What You Want,” her third track from the upcoming Reputation, showing a 180 from Taylor’s earliest work. It’s not a huge surprise that Swift’s views on love have changed from age 16 to 25, but it’s definitely something worth celebrating. The queen of the country-pop crossover has finally become the ruler of her love life and we are loving every new lyric.

So, far how has Taylor come? Grab your white horse and princess dress, it’s time for a stroll down memory lane.

 

“Our Song,” 2006

Line: “Our song is a slamming screen door.”

Taylor Swift was only 16 when she released her self-titled debut album, so we’ll let it slide that her idea of romance included dramatic fights. Rom coms, on the other hand, deserve all the blame.

 

“Love Story,” 2008

Line: “Romeo save me, they’re trying to tell me how to feel.”

In 2008, Swift was still a teen and thought love meant being saved. In 2017, Swift knows how to pack her own life jacket, cuz she’s a grown ass woman.

 

“The Way I Loved You,” 2008

Line: “But I miss screamin’ and fightin’ / And kissin’ in the rain / And it’s two a.m. and I’m cursin’ your name / You’re so in love that you act insane / And that’s the way I loved you.”

Like many people, Swift fell into the trap of being addicted to drama. Thankfully, she’s found the beauty in a partner that builds her up, not one that makes her curse his name.

 

“Sparks Fly,” 2010

Line: “My mind forgets to remind me, you’re a bad idea.”

Think of this song as part one of “I Knew You Were Trouble.”

 

“Stay, Stay, Stay,” 2012

Line: “Before you, I’d only dated self-indulgent takers / That took all of their problems out on me / But you carry my groceries, and now I’m always laughin’ / And I love you because you have given me no choice but to / Stay, stay, stay.”

Taylor’s first album of her 20s showed a huge shift in the right direction for her romantic relationships. Gone were the days of dreaming of dramatic exits and in its place were praises for healthy relationshipd built on communication and an understanding of how to argue constructively.

 

“Wildest Dreams,” 2014

Line: “He’s so tall, and handsome as hell / He’s so bad but he does it so well / I can see the end as it begins.”

Taylor’s views on romance got more realistic as she aged, knowing that you don’t change a bad boy, you just have fun with them.

 

“That’s How You Get The Girl,” 2014

Line: “I want you for worse or for better / I would wait for ever and ever”

Grown up Taylor knows that relationships mean being there for the good and the bad, something she wrote about in 2014 using her friends Jack Antonoff and Lena Dunham as her #relationshipgoals.

 

“Call It What You Want,” 2017

Line: “I want to wear his initial / On a chain round my neck, chain round my neck / Not because he owns me / But ’cause he really knows me”

Yas. Kween.