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The Most Woke Moments From The 2018 Golden Globes

Oprah Winfrey, Golden Globes

The 2018 Golden Globes took place on Sunday night and thanks to the many brave men and women who have come forward to share their stories of assault and abuse in Hollywood, the focus of the evening was on the Time’s Up movement.

Created to help support people in all industries who have been subject to harassment and abuse, the movement was the biggest winner of the evening, with those in attendance dressing in black in solidarity and many using their time at the podium to call for an end to the gender gap and the societal norm of violence against women.

As far as award shows goes, the Golden Globes were pretty woke.

Of course, there were some moments that could have done with a lot more wokeness. Though we loved seeing that the Hollywood Foreign Press president is a woman, Meher Tatna decided to not wear black, though she did don a Time’s Up pin.

As for the winners and those nominated, the stunning Call Me By Your Name, a coming of age story centered around a gay teen, was shut out, while Gary Oldman, who has a past that includes domestic assault, was honoured.

Thankfully, there were still a lot of amazing moments to come out of Sunday night’s broadcast.

Debra Messing started the conversation early on the red carpet. During her interview with E!, Messing voiced her concern that the station didn’t pay their female co-hosts as much as their male counterparts. Messing was referring to host Catt Sadler, who left the station in December after learning her co-host Jason Kennedy was being paid twice her salary.

As for dates, eight women nominated and attending Sunday’s event, including Michelle Williams, Emma Watson, Susan Sarandon, Meryl Streep, Shailene Woodley, Amy Poehler, and Emma Stone brought activists as their dates, including Tarana Burke, Marai Larasi, Rosa Clemente, Ai-jen Poo, Mónica Ramírez, Calina Lawrence, Billie Jean King and Saru Jayaraman.

Once inside the Beverly Hilton Hotel, host Seth Meyers kept the pressure on Hollywood to continue holding those in high positions accountable for any abuses of power.

History was made early in the night, with This Is Us star Sterling K. Brown winning for Best Actor in a Drama Series, making him the first black actor to ever win. Brown’s eloquent speech centred around creator Dan Fogelman, who Brown praised for writing a character that was based on a black man, not a man that happened to be black.

Many of the evening’s speeches were inspired by the Time’s Up movement, including Reese Witherspoon, who has been a vocal supporter and used her podium time to promise to continue fighting for women around the world.

Then it was time for Oprah Winfrey to take the stage to accept the Cecil B. DeMille award. On Sunday night, Winfrey became the first black woman to ever win the award and only the 15th woman to win the award in 65 years. Even more startling, Winfrey is only the fourth person of colour to win the award, following Sidney Poitier, Morgan Freeman and Denzel Washington.

Winfrey used her extended time on stage to give one of the most stirring and inspiring speeches in recent history, giving a lesson decades of abuse in the U.S. against women and a promise that a new day is on the horizon. Oprah 2020 for real.

Near the end of the evening it seemed as though nothing would be able to follow Oprah Winfrey’s incredibly moving speech, but thankfully Natalie Portman was able to get in one more message of solidarity. Remind us again why Greta Gerwig wasn’t nominated for Best Director?

Let’s also not forget about Barbra Streisand, who took big issue with being the last woman to win Best Director…back in 1983.